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Medical Experts Being Addicted

Drug Abuse In Health Care


It is not surprising to know that addiction also happens among medical practitioners and nurses. Doctors and nurses are also prone to addiction and if not handled with care in this case, it can lead to more problems in their work. The addiction rate among doctors and nurses is perhaps one of the highest among the entire workforce. There could be several reasons why professionals within the medical fraternity are turning to drugs or alcohol but the reasons are no different from many other working professionals who are facing an addiction. The reasons which have been provided for the addiction among medical professionals are various. Some are looking forward to remaining alert throughout the day or the night according to their work schedule while others could be looking for an escape route from the emotional pain after a day of making hard decisions with drastic outcomes.


According to UK Today "throughout the country in excess of 100,000 doctors, nurses, technicians and other health professional's struggle with abuse or addiction which mostly involve narcotic substances like oxycodone and fentanyl."


Medical personnel can easily reach most addictive substances, this is what makes them different from other workers, and satisfying this addiction or forming one is very possible for them due to the easy access.

However, statistics shows that these people also tend to withdraw faster than people in other professions.


Knowing If A Medical Practitioner Is Addicted

Doctors and nurses have been considered as highly functional addicts, and therefore, it can be difficult to recognise signs of dependence upon a drug or alcohol. Despite their addiction, they are able to sustain not only their work life but also home life.

Please give us a call now on 0800 246 1509, if you are an addicted medical practitioner who seeks recovery.


Some of the factors that show a medical practitioner is addicted include:

  • Often shifting their careers.
  • They are more interested in working at night where it's easier to reach any drugs coupled with the fact that little inspections are carried out during this period.
  • Being exhausted in the middle of the shift
  • Showing eagerness to administer narcotics to patients even when it's not their job.
  • Desperate to work only in night shifts or put in extra hours.
  • Taking frequent breaks to the bathroom or remaining absent without explanations.
  • Smell of alcohol on the breath or using mouthwash repeatedly.
  • Suffer from terrible family relations and money problems.
  • Dilated pupils
  • Uncommon friendly attitude towards doctors with access to prescription drugs.
  • Always making mistakes, or experiencing improper documentation.

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Understanding The Causes Of Addiction Among Healthcare Professionals

Substance abuse among medical personnel may be attributed to a number of distinct characteristics of a doctor's or nurse's work. Easy access to many popular commonly abused drugs, like Fentanyl and Oxycodone, that medical professionals enjoy is the number one cause of high addiction rate in them. They can decide to practice the feelings/vibration that follows addiction just to hype their satisfaction, because they are aware of how the substance manifests on a person.


The pressure and exhaustion that comes with their work also sometimes leads them to start using these drugs so that they can function at their peak. When these people assume responsibility for a certain outcome or begin to regret a decision that was made it can have an immense event on their emotions and mental state and can lead to substance abuse.


How Drug Abuse Affects Work

It's common for physicians who are addicted to make mistakes while working, or abandon patient's treatment, unlike the other healthy physicians. Addicted medical professionals might have problem focusing on the job on hand or miss important appointments or not complete a procedure as per the guidelines.

Doctors and nurses who are dealing with a substance addiction are not just putting themselves at a risk but are also playing around with the well-being of the patients within their care. Doctors and nurses addicted to drugs or alcohol might want to dismiss the truth about their condition, but an early intervention and treatment is in their best interest. Tackling the problem sooner than later can prevent accidents and mistakes at work.


Statistics Related To Drug And Alcohol Abuse Among Medical Professionals

Doctors and nurses are working in a profession that is highly regarded and respected. However, they are certainly not immune to addictions. There are many de-addiction programs created specifically for people working in the medical industry.

A number of states are offering programs for doctors and nurses in order to overcome their addiction while also making sure that they do not lose their license or practice. The program includes support to doctors and nurses in dealing with triggers of their addiction as they resume normal work.

Treatment programs for medical professionals addresses, among others, the following aspects:

  • Ways to recover your status and job.
  • The process of returning to a professional practice.
  • Attending to license and discipline related stuff.
  • Avoiding potential triggers within and outside the workplace.
  • Importance of taking part in monitoring programs.
  • The establishment of continued aftercare.

The high rate of recovery from addiction among healthcare professionals is something that proves encouraging for the patient. They can always get the help in recovery even from their fellow staff members and this aids in their quick recovery. Specialists at addiction treatment facilities will work with you to identify the underlying reasons for your addiction and help you regain good health again.