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Getting Assistance - Treatment

Explaining Drug Addiction

Drug addiction is a disease that causes long term changes in the brain that's characterized by an uncontrollable urge to seek out and use drugs despite knowledge of all the harmful consequences. The harmful habits of people suffering from drug addiction come as a result of these changes inside the brain. Drug dependency is a degenerative illness. Relapse is returning to a habit of drug use after a serious attempt to stop using.


Using drugs out of one's volition is the road that leads to drug addiction. With time, the user is unable to stop voluntarily the need to use the drug. Looking for and using the substance becomes uncontrollable. This unrelenting craving results from the effects of the drug on the brain over time. Dependence influences parts of the mind required in reward and inspiration, learning and memory plus control over conduct.

Addiction influences both behaviour and the brain.


Is Drug Addiction Treatable?

It can, however it is hard. Drug dependency is a long-time illness from which it is not possible to quit at will and remain clean. Many of those under treatment need it over a long time or for the rest of their lives.


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Dependency treatment must assist the individual to achieve the following:

  • Stop taking drugs
  • abstain from drugs
  • be profitable in the family, at work and in the public arena

Essentials Of Successful Treatment

These values have been observed since some scientific research was done in the mid-70s as the foundation for a successful recovery plan:

  • Dependence is a complex yet treatable sickness that influences brain capacity and behaviour.
  • There is no particular treatment that is fitting for all.
  • Easy access to rehab is of utmost importance.
  • The entire needs of the patient, not only drug use issues, should be delivered by a good treatment plan.
  • It's important to remain in treatment long enough.
  • The most common forms of treatment are behaviour therapies like counselling.
  • Behavioural therapies are often combined with medications, which are another important aspect of therapy.
  • A treatment plan must be evaluated frequently and adapted to suit the changing requirements of the patient.
  • Treatment should deal with other potential mental disorders.
  • Medically assisted detoxification is just the very first step of the treatment.
  • Involuntary treatment for addiction can also be effective.
  • When in treatment, possible drug use must be constantly monitored.
  • Patients in treatment should be tested for a variety of infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, and tuberculosis and also receive education about how to reduce the risk of getting thee illnesses.

What Steps Are Involved In Treating Addiction?

Effective treatment comprises many steps:

  • detoxification (the process through which drug is expelled from the body)
  • Behavioural advising
  • treatment (for opioid, tobacco, or alcohol addiction)
  • assessment and treatment for any co-occurring mental health concerns like anxiety and depression
  • long haul follow-up to forestall backslide

Great results can be realised with the customised medical care plan and support services.


Depending on the level of need, mental health services should be added to the medical aspect of any treatment. Often, community or family based recovery groups or support systems are used as part of follow up care.


How Is Medication Employed In Substance Dependency Treatment?

Administered under professional supervision, prescription medicines are used to help the patient ease into a life without the effects of the drug, stop cravings and manage associated ailments.

  • Withdrawal During rehab, taking some prescription drugs assists in reducing withdrawal reactions. Detoxification is just the very first step in the process and not "treatment" in itself. Patients normally go back to the use of drugs if their treatment is not continued after detoxification. According to one study of treatment centres, medications were utilised in close to 80 per cent of detoxifications (SAMHSA, 2014).
  • Relapse Prevention Patients can utilize medicines to help rebuild normal brain functioning and reduce desires. There are medications for the treatment of addictions to alcohol, tobacco/nicotine, and opioids, such as heroin or prescription pain pills. Scientists are also currently developing additional medications to treat addiction to marijuana and stimulants, like cocaine and methamphetamines. It's really common for addicts to use more than one drug and they will need treatment for each substance.

How Are Behavioural Therapies Used To Treat Drug Addiction?

Psychotherapy assists addicts to:

  • Change their behaviour toward and the way the think about their drug use
  • Upturn healthy life abilities
  • Keep going with other forms of treatment, like medication and support groups

The settings upon which patents can access their treatments and the approaches used varies.

Outpatient behavioural treatment incorporates a wide assortment of projects for patients who visit a behavioural health counsellor on a fixed schedule. Personal or group drug counselling or both of them are included in majority of the programs.


These programmes usually provide types of behavioural therapy like:

  • Cognitive behavioural therapy used to help the patient identify trigger circumstances where they are most vulnerable to taking the drugs and how to avoid them and move on to overcome the addiction
  • Multidimensional family therapy in which not just the patient but also his/her family is involved able to sort out a lot of things and help the whole family cope with the changes and heal together
  • Motivational interviewing has been used to prepare a patient to accept their problem and wants to change their actions by seeking help
  • Motivational impetuses (possibility management), which utilizes uplifting feedback to support restraint from medications

sometimes, intensive treatments that involve several outpatient sessions every week is given at first. Subsequent to finishing escalated treatment, patients move to customary outpatient treatment, which meets less frequently and for decreased hours every week to help manage their recuperation.


Residential/inpatient treatment can also be extremely successful, particularly for patients with more serious issues (including co-occurring conditions). 24-hour planned and organised care system, coupled with proper medical care and safe housing are given in residential treatment facilities that are licensed. An inpatient treatment facility can make use of different therapeutic approaches and they are usually aimed at assisting patients to lead a substance-free, crime-free life after completing the treatment.


Some examples of inpatient treatment environments are:

  • Therapeutic communities which are exceedingly organised programs in which patients stay at a home, normally for 6 to 12 months. Everybody at the facility, whether caregivers or administrators and fellow patients play a role in the recovery of the patient helping them cope with the changes and challenges of withdrawal.
  • Residential treatment that is shorter term usually focuses on detoxification and beginning focused therapy in preparation for follow up in a community based setting.
  • Recovery housing, which is normally an aftermath of inpatient or residential treatment, and where patients are given limited term housing under an expert watch. People can move onto independent life through recovery housing - it assists them for example to learn financial management or job hunting, while linking them to community based support groups.

Coping With Joining The Community

Because drug abuse changes the way the brain functions, a lot of things can trigger drug cravings. Those undergoing treatment, especially in prison or inpatient facilities will find it very useful, as they will understand the best way to handle and overcome the triggers that will face them after recovery.